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Pre and Post Workout Nutrition

Maybe you're not seeing the results in your body that you were hoping to see when you

started working out.

Or maybe you have plateaued, and it seems that muscle growth has come to a

screeching halt.

Or your workouts suck. You’re not able to move up in weights and constantly just use

the same weights week after week.


If any of those scenarios are the case, you may really want to take a look at your

nutrition surrounding your workouts.

We MUST fuel our body properly in order for it to respond as we desire that it should.

We cannot deprive our body and then expect it to perform and adapt at its highest level.


We prioritize fueling our body appropriately before and after exercise we see better

performance, due to increased energy and also due to increased energy in the muscle

itself in the form of muscle glycogen.

Glycogen is a type of carbohydrate that your body stores in your muscles and liver to

use as a source of energy when you need it. Think of it like a reserve tank of fuel that

your body can access when it needs to. When you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks

them down into glucose and stores them as glycogen in your muscles and liver. Then,

when you exercise or engage in physical activity, your body can break down the stored

glycogen to provide energy to your muscles.


When we we prioritize feeling appropriately post-exercise, we again fill up those

glycogen stores, but we also provide the nutrients your body needs to heal and recover

from the exercise. The carbs are going to replenish that Glycogen and also make sure

you have energy to get on with the rest of your day. Consuming protein after exercise

can also help to replenish amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein, in the

body. This can help to prevent muscle breakdown and promote muscle growth.

Additionally, consuming protein after exercise can help to increase satiety and reduce

hunger, which can be helpful for individuals who are trying to manage their weight.


Pre- workout

Timing;

Ideally 1-3 hours before your workout.

Sometimes that’s not possible, So then opting for a smaller meal that is protein and fast

digesting carbs, and then you can effectively get away with something like 20-30 min.

Protein’

The amount of protein needed before a workout varies depending on several factors

such as the type of exercise, the individual's body weight, and fitness goals. In general,

it's recommended to consume 0.15 to 0.25 grams of protein per pound of body weight

30 minutes to an hour before a workout.

For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, you would need to consume between 23 and 38

grams of protein before exercising. For most women this falls between 20-30g.

Consuming protein before exercise can help to provide amino acids for the body to use

during the workout, which may help with muscle protein synthesis and recovery.

Additionally, consuming protein before exercise can help to regulate blood sugar levels

and prevent muscle breakdown.

Carbs;

The amount of carbohydrates needed before a workout depends on several factors

such as the type and intensity of the exercise, the individual's body weight, and their

fitness goals. In general, it's recommended to consume 0.5 to 1 gram of carbohydrates

per pound of body weight 30 minutes to an hour before a workout.

For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, you would need to consume between 75 to 150

grams of carbohydrates before exercising. Good sources of carbohydrates include

fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and starchy vegetables like potatoes.

Consuming carbohydrates before exercise can help to provide energy for the body to

use during the workout. This can help to improve performance and prevent muscle

fatigue. Additionally, consuming carbohydrates before exercise can help to maintain

blood sugar levels, especially during high-intensity workouts.


Fats;

consuming a small amount of fat before exercise can help to slow down the digestion

of carbohydrates and provide a more sustained release of energy throughout the

workout. This can be particularly beneficial for endurance athletes or those engaging in

high-intensity workouts.

However, it's important to note that consuming too much fat before exercise can lead to

digestive discomfort and may not be beneficial for some individuals. Additionally, as

the fat takes longer to digest, you can potentially be expending energy on digestion,

instead of harnessing all energy for your workout performance.

Overall, while it's not necessary to consume a large amount of fat before exercise, it may

be beneficial for those participating in endurance training.


POST WorkOUT

Timing.

While the 30 min anabolic window has been mostly dispelled, there is still evedicience

that eating withing 90 minutes of your workout is optimal for both recovery and

replenishment of the glycogen stores.

IF you are women going through peri-menopause or post menopause, then you do want

to try to eat something- even something small that prioritzes carbs as soon as possible

(within 30 min) post exercise. This is to help you better regulate cortisol production.

Protein;

The amount of protein needed after a workout depends on several factors, such as the

type and intensity of the exercise, the individual's body weight, and their fitness goals.

However, a general guideline for most people is to consume between 0.14 to 0.23

grams of protein per pound of body weight

For most women this will fall between 20-30g.

It's also important to note that consuming protein throughout the day, not just

immediately after exercise, is crucial for muscle growth and repair. A balanced diet that


includes a variety of protein sources can help ensure you are meeting your daily protein

needs.

*** reminder, no need to fall prey to the complete protein myth. As long as you are

consuming varied sources of protein-containing foods throughout the day, your body is

smart enough to combine the amino acids to form a complete protein.

Carbs:

The amount of carbohydrates needed after a workout depends on various factors such

as the intensity and duration of the exercise, the individual's body weight, and their

fitness goals. However, as a general guideline, it is recommended to consume between

0.5 to 0.7 grams of carbohydrates per pound of body weight within 30 minutes to an

hour after exercising.

For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, you would need to consume between 75 to 105

grams of carbohydrates after a workout. Good sources of carbohydrates include fruits,

vegetables, whole grains, and starchy vegetables like potatoes.

Consuming carbohydrates after exercise can help replenish glycogen stores in the

muscles that may have been depleted during exercise. This can help to provide energy

for the body's next workout or activity.

Fats;

While fat is an important macronutrient, it's generally recommended to focus on

consuming carbohydrates and protein after a workout to replenish glycogen stores and

promote muscle recovery.

However, including a small amount of healthy fat in a post-workout meal can provide

several benefits, such as helping to slow down the digestion of carbohydrates and

providing a more sustained release of energy. It's generally recommended to aim for a

balanced post-workout meal that includes carbohydrates, protein, and some healthy

fats.

As a general guideline, it's recommended to consume around 0.25 to 0.5 grams of fat

per pound of body weight in a post-workout meal. For example, if you weigh 150

pounds, you would need to consume around 37 to 75 grams of fat in a post-workout

meal. Good sources of healthy fats include nuts, seeds, and avocados.


Some of our favorite easy to use proteins are:

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And of course! Ashwaganda!

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Too full or struggling to get in carbs? Cyclic dextrin is an amazing fast digesting carb

you can use pre or post workout to restore glycogen and help control cortisol

This is our favorite:

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And of course, Creatine;

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If this was helpful, you may want to check out our #replay on pre/post workout nutrition

inside our private community!

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